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Master of Science Degree in Homeland Security Management


Program Introduction

On May 25, 2006 the New York State Education Department approved and registered the Long Island University Homeland Security Management Institute’s Master of Science in Homeland Security Management degree – the first and only registered Master’s degree in Homeland Security in New York State and the first fully online graduate degree program to be offered by Long Island University. The Homeland Security Management Institute will begin offering the fully online M.S. in Homeland Security Management in the fall of 2006.This academically rigorous and professionally relevant 36-credit online Master’s degree builds upon and expands the 15-credit online Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management - an online graduate credential the Institute began offering in September 2005. The 15 credits of the Advanced Certificate program form the core curriculum of the Master’s degree in Homeland Security Management, permitting qualified students completing the Advanced Certificate to continue their studies and earn both the Advanced Certificate and the Master’s degree without any loss of credit.The Homeland Security Management Institute has quickly emerged as a leader in graduate-level Homeland Security/Homeland Defense education, achieving broad recognition for the exceptional quality of its online graduate curriculum, for the unrivaled combination of academic credentials and practical professional experience among its faculty of Senior Fellows, for the superb leadership and ongoing program guidance provided by its renowned Board of Advisors, and for the outstanding professionalism of its highly competent students. The Homeland Security Management Institute has been recognized and commended as “one of the nation’s leading graduate programs in the Homeland Security/Homeland Defense field” by Dr. Paul Stockton, Associate Provost of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, which began offering the nation’s first graduate degree in Homeland Security in 2002.  “The Institute’s Senior Fellows are the real deal.”All courses are delivered entirely online in an ‘asynchronous’ format that permits busy professionals from across the nation and around the globe the flexibility they want and need in graduate study. The powerful Blackboard learning platform software permits students to log in to a secure class Web site and participate in threaded discussion board dialogues or complete other course requirements at any time of the day or night. Students are never required to be online at a particular time or to be physically present at any particular place. Because our students are drawn from a diverse range of professional and occupational specialties and represent a variety of geographic regions, agencies and levels of government, the online discussions incorporate a broad array of perspectives and experiences. In turn, these varied perspectives and experiences provide a comprehensive and unsurpassed understanding of the breadth, depth and complexity of the nation’s homeland security enterprise.The online Master’s degree in Homeland Security Management consists of a total 36 credits, distributed as follows:

Core Courses  (15 credits)*
HMS 500 - Introduction to Homeland Security Management
HMS 520 - Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management
HMS 530 - Domestic and International Terrorism
HMS 540 - The Intelligence Function in Homeland Security Management
HMS 550 - Homeland Security and the Private Sector


Required Courses: (9 credits)
HMS 600 - Emergency Management
HMS 610 - Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Disaster and Terrorism
HMS 620 - Research Design and Methods in Homeland Security Management

Practicum:  (3 credits)
HMS 630 - Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security
or
HMS 640 - Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security

Electives:  (3 credits)**
HMS 650 - Border and Transportation Security
HMS 655 - Critical Infrastructure and Key Resource (CI/KR) Protection
HMS 656 - Risk Management for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Transportation Systems
HMS 657 Ė The Planning Process for Homeland Security and Transportation Security Management
HMS 658 Ė Cyber Security: Issues and Policy in Transportation and Critical Infrastructure Protection
HMS 660 - Funding and Grant Evaluation
HMS 665 - Ethical Issues in Homeland Security Management
HMS 670 - The Economics of Terrorism and Extremism
HMS 675 - Strategic Thinking in Law Enforcement Intelligence
HMS 680 - Global Terrorism and Geopolitical Configurations
HMS 685 - Securing Transportation Networks
HMS 690 - Post 9/11 America
HMS 700 - Critical Issues in Homeland Security Management
HMS 710 - Weapons of Mass Destruction
HMS 720 - Advanced Study in Homeland Security Management
HMS 730 - Leadership in Homeland Security Management

Research:  (6 credits)
HMS 750 - Thesis Research Consultation I
HMS 760 - Thesis Research Consultation II***

Total:  36 credits

*The 15-credit core is identical to the current Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management curriculum.
** Students currently employed in a Homeland Security field may, upon application to the Program Director and demonstrated competency in the practical aspects of Homeland Security Management, receive a waiver to substitute an appropriate Elective course for the Practicum requirement.
*** HMS 760 - Thesis Research Consultation, must be taken in the studentís final semester.

Course Descriptions

Core Courses:

HMS 500 - Introduction to Homeland Security Management*
This introductory course surveys the major policies, practices, concepts and challenges confronting practitioners in the complex field of Homeland Security Management. The course provides an overview of various threats to domestic security from terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and other related risks and vulnerabilities, examining the government and private sector organizations, strategies, and systems involved in protecting against and responding to these threats. Using a case study approach, the course focuses on the managerial, political, legal and organizational issues related to crisis planning and response, the National Incident Management System, risk assessment and mitigation, communications and technology systems, medical and public health emergencies, and infrastructure protection.

HMS 520 - Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management*
This course provides students with an overview of the various statutes, case law, and Constitutional issues governing the activities of practitioners involved in the Homeland Security enterprise at the federal, state and local levels. These issues and bodies of law are of critical importance to Homeland Security practitioners and policymakers, and the course considers their important social, ethical, and political implications. The central focus of the course is on the question of how to balance the goals, objectives and activities of effective Homeland Security against the compelling need to preserve and extend fundamental American civil liberties. The course examines the Constitutional and legal framework of the Homeland Security enterprise, discusses specific Constitutional issues and cases as they apply to Homeland Security, and considers the relationship between Homeland Security policies and the preservation of civil liberties. It examines the effectiveness of various court decisions and legislation including the USA PATRIOT Act in preventing and responding to the threat of terrorism as well as their role in shaping the development of Homeland Security agencies, policies, strategies, and infrastructure.

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HMS 530 - Domestic and International Terrorism*
This course provides an in-depth examination of the threat of terrorism and its impact on the Homeland Security enterprise by exploring the overall phenomena of terrorism as well as the complex motivations, ideologies, goals and tactics of various domestic and international terrorist groups. Cultural, religious and economic influences on terrorism will be considered. Students will analyze these groups in light of historical, contemporary and potential future acts of terrorism in order to refine their knowledge of terrorism prevention, detection, response and investigation. The course focuses upon such topical issues as state terrorism, political terrorism, revolutionary terrorism, religious and apocalyptic violence, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorist tactics and targeting, as well as the practical strategies and approaches of counterterrorism.

HMS 540 - The Intelligence Function in Homeland Security Management*
This course acquaints students with the concepts and practices involved in the process of collecting, analyzing and evaluating intelligence and in managing the intelligence function, as well as the influence of intelligence in shaping homeland security decision-making at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the structures, roles, and interactions of the foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of criminal justice and private sector entities, and the use of intelligence processes to support homeland security investigations, planning, and policy formulation. Based in a case study approach, students in this course will develop an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work, as well as an appreciation for the ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberties issues involved. Specific topics considered include open source intelligence, assessing the reliability and validity of information, intelligence sharing, covert and counterintelligence operations, Homeland Security managers as both producers and consumers of intelligence, and the future of homeland security intelligence.

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HMS 550 - Homeland Security and the Private Sector*
This course explores the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private-sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. Particular emphasis is paid to mitigating and managing the threat of nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological (NBCR) weapons.

Note: * Course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.

Required Courses:

HMS 600 – Emergency Management
This course examines historical and contemporary theories, principles, and practices of Emergency Management, particularly the all-hazards approach and the related processes of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Using a case study approach, the course considers the evolution of Emergency Management and its practical application within government and private-sector institutions. The roles, responsibilities, and duties of Emergency Managers at various levels of government are discussed, as are the relationships between the agencies, organizations, and individuals involved. The course acquaints students with the National Response Plan and such contemporary Emergency Management systems as the National Incident Management System (NIMS), with specific attention paid to their applicability to crises that include terrorist events, natural and man-made disasters, and other hazards. Required course.

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HMS 610 – Psychological and Sociological Aspects of Disaster and Terrorism
This course examines the traumatic psychological consequences of terrorism and disasters upon individuals and groups, as well as the individual and collective social behaviors that typically become manifest after these events. The course examines a range of psychological and social issues related to terrorism and disaster, including theories of psychological trauma, trauma prevention strategies and crisis intervention, the impact of psychological trauma upon first responders and those directly exposed to terrorism or disasters, the psychological goals of terrorism, and posttraumatic stress. Required course.

HMS 620 - Research Design and Methods in Homeland Security Management
This course surveys the various quantitative and qualitative analytic methods and research designs used for policy development and evaluation in Homeland Security fields, as well as the critical thinking skills and practical techniques involved in preparing analytical research products and reports. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach to research, and students become acquainted with such research methods as case studies, field research, surveys, content analysis, experimental designs, secondary analysis, and other forms of evaluative research. Various methods of statistical analysis are also covered, preparing students to design and conduct an original thesis research project. Required course.

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Practicum Courses:

HMS 630 – Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security
Under the supervision and direction of a member of the Homeland Security Management faculty, students participate in a planned program of observation and participation in the management operations of a Homeland Security agency.

HMS 640 - Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security
Under the supervision and direction of a member of the Homeland Security Management faculty, students undertake a project involving substantive participation in managing a major simulation, exercise, or drill involving multiple agencies or institutions. Student involvement will include planning, designing, developing, conducting and evaluating the simulation or drill.

Note: To ensure that all graduates achieve an appropriate level of practical experience and professional competence in the homeland security field, students must complete a practicum requirement by taking either HMS 630 - Practicum: Graduate Internship in Homeland Security or HMS 640 - Practicum: Exercises in Homeland Security. Students employed in a Homeland Security field may, upon application to the Program Director and demonstrated competency in the practical aspects of Homeland Security Management, receive a waiver to substitute an appropriate Elective course for the Practicum requirement.

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Elective Courses:

HMS 650 – Border and Transportation Security
This course examines the critical tasks and complex challenges involved in securing the nationís airspace and its land and maritime borders, including efforts to prevent intrusions while facilitating the lawful movement of goods and persons. Border and transportation security issues are examined in terms of their impact on the economy, national security, and public safety, with particular emphasis on the interaction between federal, state and local entities with the military and various private sector industries and organizations. Elective course.

HMS 655 – Critical Infrastructure and Key Resource (CI/KR) Protection
The terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and effects of Hurricane Katrina in the summer of 2005, poignantly illustrated to the world just how vulnerable some of our critical infrastructures (CI) and key resources (KR) were to manmade and natural disasters. This course provides the student with a detailed overview of the way in which public and private leaders are addressing critical CI/KR vulnerabilities that affect our way of life. It will explore and analyze the subsequent National Infrastructure Protection Plan and supporting Sector-Specific Plans to determine if they provide the coordinated approach necessary to set national priorities, goals, and requirements for CI/KR protection. Based on assigned readings of key government documents, independent reports and expert analyses, the student will gain a base of knowledge about the vast scope of effort and activities required to protect the nation's most essential assets. The student will also be able to reiterate the details required to reduce CI/KR vulnerabilities, deter threats, and minimize the consequences of attacks and other natural incidents across the nation. Elective course.

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HMS 656 – Risk Management for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Transportation Systems
This course explores, discusses, and analyzes the requirements for development of a comprehensive Risk Management Program for the protection of critical infrastructure assets, with particular emphasis on critical infrastructure protection within transportation systems. Areas of focus include Risk Assessment Methodologies; the prioritization of assets for capital and resource allocation; the development of protection strategies; Cost Benefit Analyses; and Business Plan development. Students will achieve and demonstrate a thorough practical understanding of asset prioritization principles, risk assessment methodologies, and capital/resource allocation for effective Critical Infrastructure Protection, particularly for transportation critical infrastructure facilities and components. Elective course.

HMS 657 – The Planning Process for Homeland Security and Transportation Security Management
The need to address long-range security challenges across the multiple disciplines and partners within the Homeland Security enterprise highlights the importance of effective Homeland Security planning and planning processes. Effective planning involves the identification of clear tasks and purposes, promotes frequent interaction between and among stakeholders, guides preparedness activities, establishes implementation procedures, and provides measures to synchronize actions. This course examines the entire planning process from the formation of a planning team, to the analysis of hazards and courses of action, to testing and validating plans by conducting exercises. Utilizing a case-study approach and with particular focus on surface transportation security planning issues, this course addresses operational planning by state and local governments, catastrophic planning at the state and regional levels, and the range of strategies and skill sets that are required to achieve successful planning and successful outcomes. Elective course.

HMS 658 Ė Cyber Security: Issues and Policy in Transportation and Critical Infrastructure Protection
This course provides an in-depth examination of the role that cyber security plays in our society and its impact on the Homeland Security enterprise by exploring the overall phenomena of cyber security issues, with particular emphasis on transportation and critical infrastructure protection. The present state of the debate surrounding cyber security and the current policies in place to deal with these issues will be examined in detail. Additionally, cyber war, cyber crime, cyber espionage, and cyber terrorism will all be considered. Students will analyze the policy implications of these subjects, achieve a detailed understanding of the issues, and acquire the knowledge and insights Homeland Security managers and executives need in order to deal effectively with the cyber threats we face. This is not a tactical level technology-oriented course, but rather it provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the cyber landscape in which we must all function. A particular focus will be given to the effect that cyber means and threats have on critical infrastructure, using case studies from the transportation sector. No special technical background is required for this course. Elective course.

HMS 660 - Funding and Grant Evaluation
This course surveys the various funding sources available in the Homeland Security field, examining the process of grant writing and the criteria and standards used by funders to evaluate grant applications. The course also covers the reporting and auditing responsibilities involved in grants management. Elective course.

HMS 665 - Ethical Issues in Homeland Security Management
This course examines the fundamental concepts and principles of ethics and ethical behavior within the homeland security / homeland defense enterprise. It considers the core ethical concepts and values articulated by moral philosophers and thinkers throughout Western history, the ethics codes of various professions, and how these ethical principles may provide guidance in identifying and resolving the ethical dilemmas homeland security and homeland defense practitioners encounter. Taking a case study approach to examine various ethical problems, the course explores issues of moral courage, the nexus between ethics and responsible leadership, and the duty to dissent or to comply with authority. Elective course.

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HMS 670 – The Economics of Terrorism and Extremism
This course focuses on the economic aspects of contemporary terrorism and extremism as well as the financing of terrorist operations. In addition to comparing the economic structures and systems of Western democracies with those of Middle East nations and examining the economic conflicts and disparities that may give rise to or exacerbate extremism and terrorism, topics include money laundering activities and the hawala remittance system. Elective course.

HMS 675 – Strategic Thinking in Law Enforcement Intelligence
This course provides participants with the concepts and practices integral to strategic thinking in law enforcement intelligence, with specific application and emphasis on the transportation security field. The roles, structures and processes of applying intelligence methods and principles to support strategic decision-making are the core of this course, and the use of intelligence methods and principles to shape enforcement, crime reduction and homeland security strategies are discussed and evaluated. The essentials of intelligence-led policing, and the processes of collection, analysis, interagency collaboration, planning and direction, tasking and coordination, and intelligence management are explored, with specific reference to transportation security Based in a case study approach, students develop a full understanding of the application of intelligence in setting a strategic agenda for law enforcement organizations, consistent with ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberty issues. Elective course.

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HMS 680 – Global Terrorism and Geopolitical Configurations
This course critically analyzes the dynamic and evolving geopolitical context of terrorism prior to and including the Modern Age of Terrorism, which began in the late 1960s and continues today. Changes in political, diplomatic, military, and/or economic alliances and policies in the United States and other nations often alter, modify, and affect the objectives of extremist groups and the terrorist acts they carry out. Particular attention is paid to perceived threats of terrorism and the geopolitical objectives of the al Qaeda network and its affiliates as their impact on the United States, Europe, and other global regions. Elective course.

HMS 685 – Securing Transportation Networks
This course provides students with the concepts and practices integral to establishing frameworks necessary to manage and mitigate threats, risks, and vulnerabilities specific to securing transportation networks. Transportation networks are of primary concern for homeland security professionals because disruptions to these networks can significantly impact life, property, and commerce. Threats to transportation networks come in the form of intentional, accidental, and natural modalities. Elective course.

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HMS 690 – Post 9/11 America
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 had a profound and lasting effect upon Americansí political and social behaviors as well as their belief systems and collective social conscience, and this course critically examines how those attacks have changed American public opinion and the ĎAmerican way of life.í The course explores the roles played by the media, by political figures, and by government agencies at the federal, state and local in shaping contemporary American thought about terrorism, extremism, Homeland Security / Homeland Defense, and the Global War on Terrorism. It examines the publicís specific fears, perceptions, and expectations about terrorism and homeland security. Elective course.

HMS 700 - Critical Issues in Homeland Security Management
This course explores the evolving nature of the Homeland Security enterprise by examining a number of contemporary topical issues and their immediate and long-term impact on Homeland Security policies and practices. Particular attention is paid to the role of the media, law, governmental and non-governmental organizations, and political entities at the federal, state and local levels in determining and shaping Homeland Security policy and practice. Elective course.


HMS 710 - Weapons of Mass Destruction
This course provides a detailed overview of current and emerging threats to homeland security posed by Weapons of Mass Destruction, including the range of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. Among the issues considered in depth are US vulnerability and feasible modes of response to WMD attacks, as well as the technology and availability of WMDs and potential scenarios for their deployment by extremist groups. Elective course.

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HMS 720 - Advanced Study in Homeland Security Management
Students in this course conduct substantive independent reading and research projects in the Homeland Security field under the guidance of a member of the Homeland Security Management Instituteís faculty and with the permission of the Instituteís Director. Students are expected to prepare a substantial integrative written report at the conclusion of the semester. Elective course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of the Homeland Security Management Institute.

HMS 730 – Leadership in Homeland Security Management
This course provides the necessary foundation for an understanding of leadership and challenges to its effective implementation, with a special focus on the complexity encountered in the homeland security and interagency arenas. This course will progress through a process of self-assessment, review of selected leadership models, inquiry into the intersection between recognized leadership competency components and still-emerging HLS competency components, review of the homeland security environment, examination of leadership complexity resulting from the interplay of the interagency and public/private/non-profit sectors, and examination of possible tools to improve oneís leadership competency. The aim is to provide learners the self-knowledge and resources to improve their individual leadership competency working within the complex HLS environment. Elective course.

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Research Courses:

HMS 750 - Thesis Research Consultation I
This course prepares the student to complete the capstone thesis requirement. In consultation with a faculty member, the student will identify and develop an appropriate and policy-relevant thesis research issue in the Homeland Security field, refine that issue to distill a research question or questions, identify the sources of information and research methods suitable to complete the thesis, prepare an annotated bibliography of sources to be used, and develop and submit a comprehensive research plan in the form of a Thesis Proposal.

Note: This course is the first of a two-part sequence leading to completion of the Master of Science in Homeland Security Management programís capstone project: an academically rigorous thesis that reflects the standards, norms, and conventions of academic research at the graduate level and advances the field of knowledge in this evolving discipline.

HMS 760 - Thesis Research Consultation II
With the guidance and supervision of members of his or her thesis committee, the student will carry out the independent capstone research project outlined in the Thesis Proposal submitted at the conclusion of HMS 750 - Thesis Research Consultation I. The thesis project will demonstrate the studentís mastery of a substantive issue in the Homeland Security Management field, as well as his or her competence in presenting the results of a substantial academic and/or policy research project in a comprehensive, cogent, and coherent written thesis. The capstone thesis will demonstrate the studentís understanding of the academic and/or policy research process, display his or her capacity to identify, assess, and review relevant literature and other sources of information, confirm his or her ability to formulate cogent research questions, and validate his or her ability to select and use appropriate research methods to explore those research questions.

Note: This course is the second of a two-part sequence leading to completion of the Master of Science in Homeland Security Management programís capstone project: an academically rigorous thesis that reflects the standards, norms, and conventions of academic research at the graduate level and advances the field of knowledge in this evolving discipline. HMS 760 must be taken in the studentís final semester.

Note: Upon application to the programís Director and with the consent of the Board of Advisors member concerned, students may request that a member of the Instituteís Board of Advisors serve on the studentís thesis committee in the capacity of Third Reader.

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